Golden Light In My Life

Six years in the context of an average human lifespan is not very long.    Six years to a dog is quite a long time especially when that dog’s life span is 12 or 13 years on average.  Six years for Kali and I is both a flash and an eternity.

A flash in that it seems like just the other day I was sitting in the international terminal at San Francisco International Airport waiting for my precious cargo to be unloaded.  Waiting with two months of accumulated anticipation since first seeing Kali’s picture on the Facebook page called “Rescued Love From Taiwan”.   This group coordinates with True Love Rescue to bring mostly Golden Retrievers from Taiwan to loving families in Northern California.  This was where Kali came from.  I’ve documented that story of Kali’s journey from Taiwan to America any times.  Newer followers of Golden Kali can read about it here:  Meet Kali.

It also feels like an eternity because of the countless experiences Kali and I have had together during the past six years.  For much of this time Kali  was rarely far from my side.  As I write this post she lies sleeping at my feet; a very familiar spot and one that is so natural to both of us.  We estimated Kali’s age to be five years when she joined our pack.  Now a full fledged senior at 11 her hip dysplasia slows her down quite a bit.  Her cataracts impair her vision.  She’s developed either acute selective hearing or just plain hearing loss.  I believe it is the latter.   Still, Kali’s  love and devotion remain ever present and stronger than ever.  I try every day to live up to that example she sets for me!

Each year Memorial Weekend marks Kali’s Gotcha Day.

So here on the Sunday of the 2020 Memorial Day holiday I sit reflecting on that same weekend in 2014 when we welcomed Kali into our family and into our home in Livermore, CA.   Kali adjusted to her new life almost immediately.  The bond between us was instant.  For two years we carried out an almost daily routine of morning walks, meals, playtime in the afternoon, and cuddles in the evening.

In 2016 we added a new nine-week old puppy to the pack and named her Kloe.  Kali welcomed her with open paws and became a great big sister and teacher.   Within two weeks we moved to the Sierra Nevada Foothill town of Tuolumne, CA.  Kali took it all in stride welcoming her new surroundings and new baby sister.  “But wait Kali – there’s more…”

In 2018 we adopted Koda, a four month old rescue.  Koda was, and is, a bundle of energy and moxie!  This time around Kali is not as actively involved with the younger pup.  She stays above the fray and leaves the heavy lifting to her younger sister Kloe all the while remaining near by and willing to offer advice (woof!) and criticism (“Zzzz”) when necessary.

So on this 2020 Memorial weekend, as we remain mostly sheltered in place,  I am feeling blessed that my Golden Kali remains in my life and by my side.

Happy Gotcha Day Kali.  You will forever be the Golden light in my life and at The Golden K.

 

Routines

Our morning routine at The Golden K typically kicks off with me opening my eyes to a morning sun and calmly rising from bed Koda sitting at the side of my bed insisting that we start our day; as in RIGHT NOW.   That’s usually around 6:15.  She is less insistent passionate as she has grown older but none the less very determined to get my attention and start our day.   But I can’t put it all on Koda .

Kali has usually been awake since 5:30.  She stands up in a dark bedroom and stares in my direction.   When she realizes I am not awake she’ll walk into the bathroom to get water.  Tap tap tap her nails go clicking across the tile as she subconsciously hopes her activity will get my attention.  When it does not she returns to the bedroom and shakes her head flapping her ears and rattling her collar to see if that will get my attention.   When it doesn’t she reluctantly lies back down with a thud and deep sigh.   She’s resigned to leaving the task of waking me to her younger and more determined sister.

Then there is Kloe.  Kloe is our  teenager-like girl who would be content to sleep and lounge in bed until lunchtime.   When Koda and Kali finally do get my attention and I get up I have to “encourage” Kloe to join us but sticking my foot under butt until she finally gets up and follows us out of the bedroom.

And so our day begins.

Turn the coffee pot on that Holly has prepared the evening before.   Administer CBD oil to Kali and Kloe who both have varying degrees of hip dysplasia.  Send the three girls outside to do their “business”.  Kali returns immediately: squat, pee, let me back in please so we can get on with food!   But the red girls take more time exercising their olfactory surveying the property “see” what critters may have come through over night.   Eventually they return and breakfast, consisting of chicken and rice kibble and egg whites, is served.  Kali is content to lie down and return to sleep; after all she’s been awake since 5:30.  Kloe and Koda restlessly wait for me to finish coffee and breakfast.  How dare I take so long to do so!   They know walks are to follow.

By now it’s about 8:00 and we take our 30 minute walk sometimes 1:1; me with Koda and later Holly with Kloe.  More recently it’s been me with both girls using the leash coupler which they’ve adapted to fairly well.  After walks the red girls are on their own to spend the morning asking to come in the house.  And then asking to go out.  And then asking to come in.  Meanwhile, Kali has been sleeping and is content to do so until Holly or I go into the kitchen to make lunch.  Because when there is someone in the kitchen there is always a chance for food.

This morning after walks was different.  The red girls were content staying  outside rather than following me into the house as they usually do.  They seemed to appreciate the mild weather and calmness in the air showing an unusual (and welcome) independence.  Fighting the urge to get on with my day and “get something done” around the house I joined the red girls outside.  I brought along a cup of tea and my computer to write this post.  Much to my surprise and pleasure Kali joined us and instead of lying down to sleep she began exploring and foraging with her sisters.

Although the three girls are always together they are not always “together”.   Kali and Kloe tend to do their thing (rough-housing, exploring, digging, barking at critters) and Kali tends to do hers (sleep).  The contrast is obvious and understandable.  Kloe is in her prime at four years old.  Koda is emerging from puppyhood at almost two years.  Kali’s At 11 years old it’s obvious why Kali’s post breakfast day is much different than that of the Kloe and Koda’s.

So this morning we had nowhere to go and all morning to get there.   But what made that trip so special was my Golden Kali was along for the ride.

 

Stay!

Most dogs know the word stay; especially when accompanied by an open hand in front of their face.  Some people, well not so much.

It’s a trying time for our global community in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.   The stay at home orders continue to grow state by state and, in varying degrees, Americans are heeding the advice and direction from our leaders and scientists.  Privileged Americans that we are with all our civil liberties sometimes have a hard time being told what to do or when to do it.  We are reluctant or even unwilling to adjust out routines for the better good of the world community.   But “stay” is a very important word right now for all of us to hear, and adhere to.  It’s our best chance to slow the spread of this virus.

Having said that I know that many two legged pack members cannot stay.  Many are healthcare professionals treating the infected and helping them to get healthy.  Many are working to keep stores open so those of us who are not sick have the basic supplies we need to stay healthy.  And that list goes on for those who cannot stay.  But for those of you that can, please….STAY!   Don’t make me put my hand in front of your face…. 🙂

Meanwhile, life goes on without many changes for my girls.  The biggest disruption for Kali, Kloe, and Koda is the wet weather we’ve had the past two weeks.  It’s  kept them mostly sheltering in place in the house instead of outside in the sun.  Kali actually prefers to be in the house even when the weather is warm and dry.  Her 11 year old bones are much more comfortable when she is asleep in front of the pellet stove or in a sun drenched area of the kitchen.   She is a black belt at “down stay”.

I’m pretty sure the girls are enjoying the enhanced family time.  But I wonder if there will come a point where they wish we would go just away for a while so that they could sleep in peace.  The humans in this pack have been very good at stay but not so good at down-stay or sit-stay.   We tend to move around a lot during the day.  We’re constantly working, cleaning, and milling around.   It’s not until evening that we allow ourselves to settle down and relax.   I think the girls are exhausted by the end of the day from watching so much activity during what is usually their alone time.

We should also take some cues from our girls during this (hopefully) unique period of time and just settle.  Those of us who remain healthy should first and foremost count our blessings. But then maybe find some sun and take a nap.  Or take a long chew on a good book.  Or maybe use our noses to guide us around the yard and sniff out something we have not noticed before.  Because with continued adherence to stay,  good science, and good leadership it won’t be long before us humans are back in full blown fetch mode.

From all of us at The Golden K we wish all of our Golden Kali followers and their families good health and good luck riding out this difficult time.

Stay! and take care,

Kali, Kloe, Koda, Michael and Holly.

Shelter In Place

Sheltering In Place Experts

Falling In Love With Koda

I’ve always taken for granted that I love all my girls desperately and without reservation.       So I caught myself by surprise recently when I was looking at Koda and realized that I had fallen in love with her.   Not at that moment, or even on that day.   But over the months I had fallen head over heals in love with the youngest of my three girls.

That’s not to say that I don’t love my other girls with equal passion.   I do.  But I realize now that the dynamics of adding a third dog placed more demands on the pack than I had anticipated.  Like children to some degree adding numbers to your family has an exponential effect.   One dog is like having one dog.  Two is like four and three is like nine.   Or at least that’s how it feels at times.  My love is bottomless so it’s not really a problem. They put more in my tank than take out…

Koda, now 21 months, joined our pack at four months old.  From the moment I brought her home it was clear that she was going to be a force to be reckoned with a handful.  She had tenacity both physically and vocally.  In play with her big sister Kloe – who outweighed her by almost 60 pounds at the time – Koda never backed down even when Kloe tried to tell her enough was enough.   When I told her I didn’t like something she was doing she would slink her body around puffing up her cheeks and letting out a stream of profanities vocalizations that sounds like “A rooo rooo rooo!”  If I were to  translate those sounds into words they would have to be written something like, “#@%&#*!!”.

Koda’s tenacity and determination was evident from day one.   The Golden K sits on five acres and the girls have designated fenced areas for their safety.  Koda quickly found that she could slip through the bars of a wrought iron gate that leads out of one of those fenced areas.   In some ways it was endearing because the only reason she wanted to escape was to be me with who at the time was doing some work in another part of the property.   I put chicken wire on the fence the next day to keep her from slipping through the bars.  No problem for Koda – she scaled the fence, again in an effort to follow me to where I was going.  There were several iterations of this as I experimented with various methods to keep her inside the safety zone.  With each escape she would come trotting up to me smiling as if to say, “I found you. I’m here.  I figured out how to scale the fence”, or “I missed you and I was able to slip under the bottom of the railing” and so on.

Koda was destructive at times chewing on furniture and finding her way to clothes, shoes, and other personal items.   Some of that’s on me of course but still Koda seemed to set new household records for finding her way to trouble.   The drip lines in the garden?  No matter how deep I buried them Koda found them.  Sprinkler heads? No problem. Apparently she knows how to twist them off the risers and with her jaw.   Last summer was dry and brown in the garden to say the least!

Koda Koda Koda!   The typical third child who believes the rules don’t apply to them.  But over the months this tenacious pup has fallen into line (mostly).    Through maturity and a lot of time and training on our part Koda has tempered her “enthusiasm” and is learning to respect the pack.  She and I recently completed intermediate obedience training with our local AKC group.  I was so happy and proud to see how eager she has become to learn and please me as her handler and as her dad.

Throughout much of last year Kloe was injured or recovering from her bi-lateral TPLO surgery.  During much of that time Koda was challenging the status quo and finding new ways to test our patience.  Much of our energy went into “managing” Koda and nursing Kloe back to health.  Plus Kali is getting on in years (almost 11) and sometimes needs special attention and help.  Distraction was definitely a theme for 2019!

I now realize that throughout these past and sometimes tumultuous 17 months I was falling in love with Koda.  Maybe it was the aforementioned distractions.   Maybe I simply took it for granted.  Certainly I didn’t expect this deepening of love to be a journey.   I don’t believe Koda will ever lose the tenacity she displayed from the moment she arrived home.   Nor do I want her to. I believe it will serve her well over the years even if at times it is a challenge for me.  In many ways it has helped me to be a better pup-parent.

As it turns out falling in love doesn’t happen over night.   It really is a journey and I’m  blessed to have Koda as my guide.

Koda then and now

 

 

Grateful This Christmas Eve

A Christmas Eve walk with Kloe this morning put this particular holiday season in perspective for me.  It was a brisk forty five degrees as we headed out at about 8:30 am.   The morning was calm with no wind, the tall pine trees at the Golden K were still, the sky was grey but dry, and the neighborhood was quiet.

As Kloe and I headed out I was grateful that we had nowhere in particular to go and all day to get there.  Quite a difference from the days when my children were small and there were so many tasks to complete in time for the “big day”.  All those tasks parents like us were fortunate to be able to undertake to make that big day special for our children.  They were great times that I will cherish forever.  But I have to admit this morning as we headed out to walk I was grateful that those days were in the past and Kloe and I were in the present.

This has been quite a year for my special girl Kloe.   It was April when she was diagnosed with a torn CCL.   For over seven months we nursed her back to health.  In that time she tore the other CCL,  had double CCL surgery (bi-lateral TPLO), and then convalesced back to so far what seems to be a full recovery.  During that period much of our life was consumed with caring for (and worrying about!) Kloe.  Her injuries had a major impact on our lives as well as her two sisters who often took a back seat to Kloe’s needs; especially puppy Koda who just wanted to play with big-sissie but could not because Kloe was at zero activity level.

So as we walked in the crisp air I reflected on how grateful I am for Kloe’s recovery.  Grateful for having the flexibility and resources to dedicate much of our time over the past months to ensure the best chance for her recovery.  Grateful that she is now pain free, can run and jump without restrictions,  can wrestle with puppy Kloe and just be a dog again.  But mostly I am grateful that Kloe came into our lives as a nine week old pup three and half years ago and changed our lives for the better and for ever.

Kloe and I stopped along the seasonal creek to take a quick photo and memorialize this special walk.

Christmas Eve morning 2019

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Road Trip with Kali

Kali doesn’t get out to often these days.  At ten and a half she prefers instead to sleep much of the day and inside the house given the choice. After all these years she’s earned it.  Until recently Kloe was also house bound for much of the year due to her injury and then post surgery recovery period.   So for several months it’s mostly been just Koda who gets to get out of the house and accompany us on various errands and car rides.

Kloe is mostly cleared now for normal activities after her surgery so she has been getting out and walking more and coming along for various excursions.   Today we decided to head out to a favorite spot of ours to get our growler filled with apple cider and to enjoy the relatively mild day.  Our routine, now that Kloe is back on her feet so to speak, is to take the “red girls” with us when we go out and about.  Red girls being Kloe and Koda. Kali, the blondie or cream girl, typically stays behind content to sleep in peace without her sisters (or us) milling around and interrupting her daytime slumbers.

So we “geared” Kloe and Koda up with their harnesses and leashes, filled our pockets with treats, and headed towards the door to leave.  As I glanced back at Kali she flashed me sad eyes as if to say, “Can I go? I promise not to be any trouble and I’ll do my best to keep up with the younger Red Girls as we walk around even though my legs aren’t as strong as they used to be.  Can I go?”

I smiled at Kali and then hollered down to Holly who had already gone down the stairs to the garage,  “Road trip! Kali’s coming along.”

And for the first time in a long time we packed up all three girls into the car and headed out for a road trip with Kali and her posse.   It sure felt great to all be together on a short trip to one of our favorite places on a beautiful Fall day with our beautiful girls!

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ROADTRIP! Kali and her posse of red girls.

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Holly and “the girls”.

Kloeville

I’m a worrier and also an optimist and worry and hope have been omnipresent since Kloe’s Bi-Lateral Tibia Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) just over ten weeks ago.

It was sometime in April when we learned that Kloe had a torn CCL and then a few weeks later when she tore the other CCL.  Because both tears were partial our vet suggested a wait and see approach.  Wait and see if they heal on their own.   This meant that Kloe would have to be held to almost zero activity in order to give these ligaments a chance to heal.  They  didn’t.

After four months of watching an waiting it was clear that surgery would be necessary in order for Kloe to return to normal activities and a normal of life.  Our vet recommended the TPLO.  Kloe is only three and a half and god willing has many more years of running, jumping, wrestling, and frolicking to experience.  Without surgery she wouldn’t have that.  At least not without pain.

Now, after ten weeks post surgery and observing daily improvement in Kloe,  I have even more hope and reassurances although the worry is still there in the background.

The TPLO surgery is invasive and includes cutting a semi circle through the tibia and then repositioning the bone with a plate and screws.

We have the most fantastic vet and her guidance throughout the past six months has been invaluable.   She told us to begin taking Kloe on short walks on flat ground at four weeks.  Apparently this stimulates healing process in the bones.  At eight weeks we began walks of increasing distance and also began a little up hill walking and a few stairs.  The idea is to go slow enough to be safe but also to begin introducing normal activities.   Most recently in the past few days we have allowed Kloe to be outside off leash under our supervision.

Play with sister Koda (the 18 month old) is still supervised and broken up when it get’s too rough or extends too long.  But play has begun again and both Kloe and Koda are enjoying that to say the least.

It makes us so happy to see Kloe happy again.  To see her smiling again.  To see her go to Kloeville which is lying on her back with a ball in her mouth and just staring into the sky.  Kloeville!   Kloe’s old playful personality has reemerged and Puppy Poses are frequent.

Dogs mostly live in the here an now.  But if Kloe could remember or realize all she’s been through in the past six months she would be very proud of herself for how far she has come.  I know I am!

KLOEVILLE

 

Koda Gotcha Day

Koda’s “Gotcha Day” was this past Saturday and it came and went without fanfare or much excitement.   The same can’t be said for the first year she’s been with us.  It’s been quite the year of the puppy around the Golden K…  In many ways the Year of Koda!

We adopted Koda at 16 weeks old through the same Golden Retriever rescue group all our girls have come through.  As soon as I got her home I realized we had one tenacious pup on our hands.   Upon getting home I introduced her to our other girls who were only mildly interested.

Upon arriving home with Koda, Kali – almost ten years old at the time – had the same reaction she had when we brought Kloe home two years before: alternating looks between Koda and me, “Sniff, sniff…. WOOF, BARK, WOOF”.  Translation:  “Oh no no no.  You take that little pup right back to where you got her!  I will not stand for that in my house.”

Kloe was much more interested sniffing Koda up , down and under.  They began running and playing and it was now evident to Kali, and much to her chagrin, that this pup was here to stay.  Kali was probably thinking, “Great Kloe, we had it pretty good here just the two of us and now because of your open mindedness and welcoming demeanor this pup is probably going to stay”.  But Kali being Kali who above all is a gentle and loving soul quickly accepted Koda and has even taken on the occasional role of mom to her.

Koda was not shy about immediately exploring her new surroundings and getting in the face of her new sisters.  If her sisters tried to “school” Koda she would put her head down and her butt up in the air, puff up her mouth, and make this “aroo roo roo” sound as if to say, “bring it!”.  This has become a signature trait for this fearless little girl.

Koda’s tenacity was also immediately evident in her play, in her response to being scolded, and in her unrelenting desire to engage in rough play with her older sister Kloe.  She quickly learned and seem to accept that Kali was not going to play with her.  But as long as Kloe responded to Koda’s overtures that was fine for Koda.  As most puppies will do Koda initiated play with Kloe often by blind-siding her and jumping on her back or with a head crashing  tackle to her face.  The thing about it was that Koda at that time was just 22 pounds and Kloe was 80.  It didn’t seem to phase Koda.

Most older dogs instinctively are aware of their larger size and will go easy on a younger smaller pup.  Kloe started out this way but quickly learned that Koda was not your normal little pup who acquiesces to an older and much larger dog.  When provoked Kloe would thrash Koda around pretty good but each time Koda went back for more usually with an extended “aroo roo roo” head low to the ground and butt in the air tail ‘awagging.  “Bring it !  You’re not so big.  I can take it and give you some right back….a roo roo roo roo…”

Koda has been more challenging than her sisters ever were. Kali was a mature five year old when we adopted her and she demonstrated immediate respect for authority and her surroundings.  Kloe was a normal puppy with normal challenges but she is a rule follower by nature and therefore has always been easy to manage.  Koda on the other hand?  Well, “aroo roo roo” says it all!

“Down Koda”.  “Aroo roo roo”.   “Koda leave it!”  “Aroo roo roo, GRRRR, aroo!”.

Koda is still learning that every dog she meets is not instantly ready or able to play and that every stranger we meet is not a human trampoline for her personal use.  She is also slowly learning that good things happen when she is calm and obedient.  I’m growing too.  I’ve had to learn and deploy different training and management techniques.  I’ve had to develop more patience.  And, I’ve become a bit more tenacious myself in my commitment to helping Koda become the best dog she can be.

So one year down – the year of the Koda – and God willing many many more to come!

Happy Gotcha Day sweetie girl Koda!

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Koda First day at the Golden K

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Koda at about 5 months “aroo roo roo!”

 

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The heart of The Golden K

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Koda on her Gotcha Day

 

 

 

A Model Patient

It’s been three weeks since Kloe had her Bi-lateral TPLO surgery.   She is doing fantastic!  She is feeling so good that the hard part now will be to keep her on a short leash  – figuratively and literally – for at least another month or so.

The first few days home Kloe mostly slept and soaked up the love and attention that we gave her almost 24 x 7 staying within feet away to make sure there were no mishaps.  We’re fortunate that we have a one bedroom apartment under our home that has ground level access and a small patio area.  The apartment is used for friends and family when they visit the Golden K.  But for the first ten days post surgery it was Kloe’s convalescent home staffed primarily by Holly who did what she is so good at – taking care of her family.  I spelled Holly from time to time but it was mostly Holly who monitored Kloe during the critical first several days, administering medicine and changing bandages when needed.   Holly created a safe and comfortable environment for Kloe setting up a day bed in the main living area of the apartment and a nighttime bed in the bedroom where Holly could sleep on the floor next to Kloe.

After a few days Kloe became more ambulatory and willing to walk the few feet to the patio to “get busy” what we call it for our girls to pee and poop.   The summer temps were very warm and Kloe relaxed next to Holly’s side on the shaded patio.   Every minute that passed Kloe’s bones were knitting back together and our vet said a little bit of walking helped that process.

After about ten days we felt Kloe was strong enough, and safe enough, to come back upstairs.  Between the car, the driveway to the upper part of our home, and me carrying a heavy 75 pound load for the last 40 feet Kloe arrived back upstairs.   We celebrated on the deck by doing what we normally do – hang out with our girls, drink wine, BBQ, and enjoy the beauty of the Golden K.  It was great to have the band pack  back together!

The five of us are together so much that ten days of fragmented family life seemed like a lifetime.  It was great for this group of habit creatures to be back in our routine, even if it meant Kloe had to be tethered while on the deck.   She also must be on leash when we take her to “get busy” (pee and poop).  The sight of a squirrel, feral cat, or other critter could cause her to take off and run and jump which for now is a major no-no.

Since then we’ve lengthened the leash a bit but Kloe can still not be outside untethered. She once again has mostly free reign inside the house but when we leave she has to be sequestered in our bedroom by herself.  We’ve come too long to risk injury or setbacks.  Our vet says that in a week we can begin taking her for short walks – five minutes – on flat ground.  What comes after that I’m not sure.

I’m trying not to get to far ahead of things but I can’t help but wonder what the signal or trigger will be for when we can let her off leash outside and let her return to “normal” activities.  The prognosis is that she will return to almost 100% of her old self with periodic spells of soreness after very active periods.  In my eye’s mind I can see her muscular athletic body running through the Golden K as she once used to.  That image makes me both very happy and also scared.  I’m a worrier and I know I will be cringing every step of her way at first but hopefully not forever.

So for now I try not to think too much about the whats and whens of Kloe returning to normal activities and just focus on how far our sweet girl has come.  She’s been a model patient, stoically accepting everything we’ve thrown at her over the past several months not least of all an invasive surgery and long recovery period where she now feels normal but cannot yet act normal.  All in good time sweet girl (the authors says for himself as much as for the patient)….

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Kloe hanging on the deck next to me while I write this post

TPLO

Golden Kali followers may recall my last post where I described our three year old Kloe’s condition: two torn CCL’s (cranial cruciate ligament) that after three months did not heal on their own as we had hoped.   The TPLO (tibial plateau leveling osteotomy) surgery took place this past Wednesday and everything went as planned.  No surprises, no complications, and a prognosis of full recovery over the next few months.

With surgery behind us the recovery period begins and Kloe’s condition should get better every day.  The hardest part now may be keeping Kloe’s activity level to almost zero for the next four weeks.   She will begin feeling better and stronger each day.  After about four weeks we can begin to introduce more structured and supervised activities but no running, jumping, or play for at least 8 weeks or longer.  Aside from a swelling and the trauma of surgery, where a semi-circle of the tibia is sawed, rotated, and secured back in place with an orthopedic plate, Kloe’s knees after four days are probably feeling better than they were before the surgery.   For those interested in more info on the TPLO procedure you can get it here.

Dropping Kloe off Wednesday morning for the surgery was one of the hardest things I’ve had to do.  During the days leading up to surgery both Holly and I were stressed, worried, and didn’t sleep well.  We trust our vet Dr. Tanya Jackson without reservation.  The surgeon she recommended, Dr. Justin Uhl, has a lot of expertise with the TPLO procedure.  Plus Dr. Jackson would be assisting him and by Kloe’s side the entire time.  Still, when I worry about things outside my control I go to that dark place of unfounded fears.

What if the saw cuts through the bone got botched? What if Kloe had a problem with the anesthesia and didn’t wake up?  What if during surgery there was an emergency like a major fire or earthquake and the building had to be evacuated?  What if a giant fissure opened in the earth and the building, Kloe, and the doctors fell to the earth’s core of molten lava where evil monsters prey on canines?  What if!

I kept mostly busy Wednesday but found myself looking at the clock periodically. The surgery was to take place about 1:00 and take up to two hours.   At 12:30 I told myself that Kloe was probably sedated by now and therefore not too aware of things.  At 1:15 I told myself that she was now under anesthesia so not awake or scared.  At 2:45 I told myself they were probably sticking her up.  At 3:30 the phone rang and it was Dr. Uhl.

Dr. Uhl told me that Kloe was starting to wake up and that the surgery  went just fine.   I asked him if she would fully recover and he said she would and be able to resume normal activities in a few months so long as we took good care during the recovery period.  I wanted to ask him if there had a been any natural disaster warnings or if he had noticed a fissure opening in the earth’s crust but I though better of it and simply thanked him and hung up.

Dr. Jackson is the best.  Around 9:00 that evening she called to give us an update.  She was still at the office and had been sitting with Kloe for quite some time.  She told us Kloe was looking more like her normal self, and staring into the doc’s eyes and pulling the doc closer to her with her paw.  That’s our Kloe.

Kloe has been home since Thursday afternoon and recovery is going very well and has been a model patient.  Each day the redness and swelling diminishes and her spirits elevate.  She is starting to get up on her own and taking a few steps without assistance.

So, day four.   We’ve got a long way to go but we will go as far and as long to get our Kloe healthy and back on her CCL’s, or feet as the case may be.